A Reflection of Me: What is book diversity, anyway?

My favorite book series growing up was Junie B. Jones. I shared her iconic hairstyle until I was probably 10 and told my mom bangs were no longer cool. She was such a personality – crazy and sassy but also friendly and caring. Every time I opened one of her stories I felt I was…

Instilling reading habits and skills in early childhood

Advertising has always intrigued my son. I think the loud colors, big letters, and catchy jingles worked their magic at first, but he became aware of the power of words much earlier than I expected. If he could say it, he could ask for it, refuse it, and (frighteningly) repeat it! Now a preschooler, he…

Celebrate National Reading Day, Go Beyond the Book

Today’s the day! It’s National Reading Day; a time to share your love of reading and to encourage this love in younger children. And while we know we should be doing this everyday, it’s always good to have a reminder of the importance of reading, not only for the youth of America, but for the…

3 Ways to Make Reading Fun & Easy During the Holidays

There are so many different books out there to pique the pickiest reader’s interest, but the most successful way to enjoy reading of any kind, especially during the holidays, is to make it about family and tradition. Families that read together, stay together. Make reading a family affair, especially during the holiday season. Many children…

Reading over the holidays: A go-to guide for the entire family

Winter (Break) Is Coming. Which means that for many kiddos, focusing on the festive sights and sounds surrounding them just before the holidays can serve as a distraction to their learning, which oftentimes is left behind over break. A great way to keep the little ones ready for that first day back is to make…

All Hope is Not Lost: Getting Young Boys to Read

We’ve noticed a pattern in the students we serve at DIBS for Kids. You’ve probably noticed it too. Of course it’s not always the case, but generally boys are more likely than girls to shy away from reading. To get to the bottom of this, I spent time speaking with a single mother of two,…

What Got Us Here, Won’t Get Us There

A Message from our Founder I used to tell people I was a “social entrepreneur.” I think they thought I sold drugs. Equipped with this wisdom, let me try to more simply state exactly what it is I’ve been doing for the last six years. In 2011 I began designing what has since become the…

How Can We Help Houston?

As groups assess the damage and determine what they need, we may need to be patient. Like many of you out there, our team has been feeling the heartbreak the city of Houston and surrounding areas are experiencing right now, and wondering if there’s anything we can do to help those areas pull things back…

How do we know when technology is helpful or harmful?

As an educational program that relies on technology to function, the impact that our software has on students is something we, well, sometimes worry about. And for good reason. Research shows that certain interactions with tech devices raise dopamine levels significantly, and impact the frontal cortex – or part of the brain that helps control…

A soccer ball and a book: How we think about kids’ relationship with reading

Hi there, I’m Gina.

As an Omaha professional, mother, and dedicated volunteer to literacy efforts, I’ve spent the past several years championing literacy through the Literacy Center, which is focused on building literacy skills for adults. I recently started working with DIBS, so you’ll be hearing more from me later on.

A vitamin vs. a pain pill: Why do we wait for kids to fall behind?

In the late 1800s, Joseph Malins, an English activist, wrote a poem about a cliff, a fence and an ambulance. The gist: There’s a cliff that’s very pleasant to walk on, so many people in the town nearby venture close to its edge. Some slip and fall into the valley below, and the town decides something has to be done.